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Tuesday, 3 July, 2001, 17:00 GMT 18:00 UK
Lawyers keep watch on Big Brother
Bubble
Bubble brought a collection of hats to the house
Evicted Big Brother contestant Bubble swapped hats regularly while on the programme in order to avoid breaking TV advertising guidelines.

Lawyers for the Channel 4 programme told The Lawyer magazine that the 25-year-old warehouse operative had been told to vary his hats because many of them displayed prominent brand names.

Josh
The solicitors are keeping an eye on Josh
Bubble had told fellow contestants on the reality TV show that the change in hats reflected his change in mood.

Programme makers are not allowed to give "undue prominence" to consumer items and brands.

The lawyers are also monitoring how often Josh mentions his London-based estate agency business.

Heated discussions

Meanwhile, Narinder, who was evicted from the house more than a week ago, has been signed up to present a radio show on Manchester's Century 105.

The medical rep will be given a mid-morning slot of the radio station.

The discussions and habits of the contestants are being closely monitored by lawyers so that Channel 4 does not break the Independent Television Commission guidelines.


There are fairness and privacy issues when people are talking... and saying things people wouldn't necessarily want broadcast

Neil Pepin, media law expert

Lawyers are also keen to ensure that no-one in the outside world is defamed by the contestants during often heated discussions.

Channel 4's media law expert Neil Pepin said there had been some close calls involving housemates make defamatory remarks.

"There are fairness and privacy issues when people are talking about people they know and their family, and saying things that those people wouldn't necessarily want broadcast," he said.

Edits

The 11 housemates were required to sign legal pledges not to make defamatory statements while on the show. Yet what constitutes defamation was never explained to the housemates so conversation in the house would not be stifled.

Editors and producers on the programme are forced to make hundreds of edits to the programme to ensure it avoids any legal repercussions.

Fellow lawyer Nigel Abbas said the housemates from series two were "more troublesome" from a legal point of view than last year's contestants.

Channel 4's digital channel, E4, has to make about 1,300 edits for every 21 hours of coverage, said Mr Abbas.

A 10-minute delay on the "live" feed allows E4's 120-strong production team to carry out the edits, which are mainly for swearing.

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