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Tuesday, 3 July, 2001, 14:25 GMT 15:25 UK
Radio station 'appeals Eminem fine'
Eminem
Eminem performed Slim Shady at the MTV Awards 2000
A Colorado radio station is appealing against its fine for playing an Eminem track, saying it sets a dangerous precedent, according to reports.

KKMG was fined $7,000 (5,000) for broadcasting an "indecent" version of rap singer Eminem's The Real Slim Shady by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

KKMG's parent company, Citadel Communications, had made the decision to play the song, believing the edited track would be acceptable.

Eminem
Edited versions of the hit were sent to stations
It has now filed appeal papers have been filed to the FCC, according to trade newspaper Variety.

The FCC acted after a listener complained in July 2000.

But the radio station is arguing that by upholding the decision the commission risks pushing hip hop and rap off the airwaves for good.

Offensive

The FCC said that the station played a version of the Eminem song that was indecent and still had some expletives, as well as innuendoes about violent misogyny and graphic sex.

The lyrics contain references intended to pander and shock, the FCC said, and violated a ban on airing patently offensive material from 0600 to 2200, when children were most likely to be listening.

According to Variety, the appeal argues that society has "reached a cultural crossroads".

It goes on to cite examples such as Ed Sullivan's decree not to show Elvis from the waist up and The Doors refusal to alter their lyrics for national TV to illustrate the changing nature of society's attitudes.

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