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Tuesday, 3 July, 2001, 12:00 GMT 13:00 UK
Didgeridoo players 'sue Survivor'
Survivor II logo
Survivor was a massive hit in America
Aboriginal didgeridoo players are suing American reality show Survivor over claims of exploitation, according to a newspaper.

David Hudson, known as the King of the Didgeridoo, told Australian newspaper the Herald Sun that the show's producers used the players' music without giving proper credit or paying them.

He said the makers of series two of the show, The Australian Outback, had gone back on their word.

Survivor creator Mark Burnett had promised the players a cut of profits from a planned CD of music for the show, Hudson added.

Didgeridoo player
The didgeridoo is a traditional Australian instrument
The idea of release a CD was eventually dropped.

Indigenous Australia, the company that produces Hudson and other Aboriginal musicians, is said to be claiming damages for misleading and deceptive conduct.

It is also suing Survivor Entertainment Group Inc and Channel 9 for breach of copyright in the Federal Court suit.

Hudson told the Herald Sun: "They definitely exploited us.

'Angry'

"It's pretty terrible, the way they have treated us. We gave them our music in good faith and they gave us nothing, not a credit, no money, nothing.

"That was fair dinkum Aussie music we gave them for that show and they took us for a ride."

Hudson, who has toured the world professionally for 20 years, said he had been angered by the treatment.

The artists claim they were led to believe they would be making up to AU$1 (36p) per CD sold around the world.

Now they are hoping to get this money through the courts, claiming up to AU$1m (363,116) in compensation.

The newpaper reports that the case is due in the Federal Court on 13 July.

See also:

23 Feb 01 | Entertainment
Pig row hits Survivor
19 Sep 00 | Entertainment
Hometown honour for Survivor winner
18 Jun 00 | Americas
Fury at 'tasteless' TV rat barbecue
22 Mar 01 | TV and Radio
US TV viewers face more reality
12 Aug 00 | Entertainment
Reality TV overload
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