BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: Entertainment: Music
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Showbiz 
Music 
Film 
Arts 
TV and Radio 
New Media 
Reviews 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Wednesday, 27 June, 2001, 09:33 GMT 10:33 UK
Springsteen still the Boss of copyright
Bruce Springsteen
Bruce Springsteen now has full control of his own music
A US federal judge has awarded Bruce Springsteen copyright control of an album of his early songs.

Pony Express, a small music company, had laid claim to the rights to Springsteen's early songs.


We're thrilled, and I think it's important and significant that Bruce now owns all of his own music.

Steven Hayes, Bruce Springsteen's Attorney
Pony Express have been told not to sell any more copies of the album, and they must destroy any existing copies.

The ruling was made by US District Court judge Harold Ackerman.

Unreleased

Springsteen's attorney, Steven Hayes, commented: "We're thrilled, and I think it's important and significant that Bruce now owns all of his own music."

Springsteen and Pony Express filed simultaneous lawsuits for the rights to Before The Fame, an album containing around 19 songs composed and performed by Springsteen between 1970 and 1974.

The songs on the album are previously unreleased songs, or out-takes from later albums.

Springsteen
Springsteen: In 1998 was awarded legal costs of 500,000
According to court documents, Springsteen's manager at the time, James Cretecos, kept the recordings for some 20 years, before selling the rights to Pony Express and JEC Music USA without Springsteen's permission.

The two companies then granted copyright to Masquerade music, a British recording company.

Artistic integrity

Masquerade were banned by the High Court in London in December 1998 from releasing the Before the Fame album - a decision which was upheld on appeal this year.

Springsteen had accused Masquerade of pirating the music he first recorded in 1972 before his first album, Greetings From Astbury Park.

Springsteen said Masquerade's attempt to claim ownership of the copyright was an attack on his artistic integrity.

At the time Springsteen said he was simply defending his music. He was awarded legal costs of 500,000.

Ackerman based his final decision of copyright infringement partly on the previous UK court ruling,

Springsteen is now seeking damages according to the profits made by Pony Express from the album, and his own court costs.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

28 Mar 01 | Entertainment
Springsteen faces fresh court battle
07 Feb 01 | Entertainment
Springsteen loses website fight
05 Dec 00 | Entertainment
Race award for Springsteen
13 Jun 00 | Americas
Springsteen out of tune with police
24 Jan 99 | Entertainment
Words with the Boss
14 Nov 00 | Business
Cyber-squatting fears grow
17 Oct 00 | Entertainment
Madonna wins cyber fight
09 Aug 00 | Europe
UN gets tough with cybersquatters
06 Oct 00 | UK
BBC's cyber victory
28 Jul 00 | Entertainment
Sting stung online
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Music stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Music stories