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Wednesday, 18 April, 2001, 13:17 GMT 14:17 UK
Throw-away items become art
Typewriter
Someone thinks its time to dump the typewriter
A pair of artists have compiled a bizarre collection of objects the public wanted to throw away to mark the end of the millennium.

The exhibition entitled Things Not Worth Keeping features a set of items people decided they could definitely live without.

Pieces in the collection include a picture of the Royal Family, an old tooth, a typewriter and an old school tie.

The creative brains behind the project, which was funded by the Millennium Commission and the Arts Council of England, are Cris Cheek and Kirsten Lavers.

Christmas pudding
An old Christmas pudding takes centre stage
The idea behind it was to create discussion on why people horde possessions and the meanings attached to the objects.

The pair are now taking the exhibition on the road in a London taxi to car boot sales around the country.

It finishes with a two-week showing outside the Platform Gallery in London from 14 May.

The exhibits were chosen from around 1,000 sent in by members of the public.

These were whittled down to a 100 items.

Other strange objects include a supermarket reward card, a picture of the Dome and Post-it notes.

The exhibition was commissioned for Small Acts for the Millennium, creating small scale projects marking the personal and political tones of the century.

A website and book of photographs have been produced to run alongside the collection.

See also:

19 Jun 98 | Millennium Dome
Why do we build to celebrate the millennium?
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