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Monday, 5 March, 2001, 02:59 GMT
Crossroads makes comeback
Kathy Staff
Kathy Staff reprises her role as gossip Doris Luke
Nearly 13 years after the death knell sounded for Crossroads it has finally re-opened for business.


If anybody fluffed their lines, missed their cue or the set wobbled it would be kept in

Jane Rossington

The soap returned to UK screens on Monday for what has been a widely anticipated revival.

In its heyday Crossroads attracted an audience of 18 million viewers but was both maligned and revered by fans and critics alike.

Once a shabby motel, Crossroads has been upgraded to a four star hotel complete with executive suites and a health spa.

James Mckenzie Robinson as Ray Dobbs
New face: James Mckenzie Robinson as Ray Dobbs
More famous than its characters and its melodramatic storylines were its wobbly sets and fluffed lines.

The show was axed in 1988 after more than 24 years but Carlton Television has taken the brave step of breathing life into the old soap.

It will go out in the lunchtime and teatime slots vacated by Aussie soap Home and Away, which was poached by Channel 5.

Just three characters have survived the wilderness years.

Jill Richardson, Adam Chance and Doris Luke are being reprised, played by original actors Jane Rossington, Tony Adams and Kathy Staff.

Wobbly walls

Sherrie Hewson joins the cast as housekeeper Virginia Raven, after leaving Coronation Street in October 1997.

1988 cast
The show closed in 1988
Reliving the nightmare of the shaky sets and shaky acting, Rossington said: "Although it was not live, we would film it as though it was live because of the hectic schedule.

"We would record the first half in one take and the same of the second part.

"So if anybody fluffed their lines, missed their cue or the set wobbled it would be kept in."

A bigger investment means the five-night-a-week show should be a slicker product and missing its wobbly walls, say producers.

There will also be a younger cast, with many characters in their 20s or under, to appeal to a youth audience.

See also:

05 Mar 01 | Entertainment
Bad service at new Crossroads
30 Aug 00 | Entertainment
Crossroads comes back to ITV
05 Mar 01 | Entertainment
A brief history of Crossroads
17 May 99 | Entertainment
Made in the 70s, still going strong
05 Mar 01 | Entertainment
Crossroads - then and now
28 Nov 00 | Entertainment
Cameras roll on Crossroads remake
14 Feb 01 | Entertainment
Nora Batty to join Crossroads
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