Page last updated at 10:02 GMT, Wednesday, 3 February 2010

Boeing and Airbus predict Asian sales surge

Singapore Airlines' Airbus A380
Large planes are expected to sell well in the region

Airlines in the Asia-Pacific region are emerging as the biggest customers for aircraft makers Boeing and Airbus.

Over the next two decades, more than 8,000 planes worth up $1.2 trillion (£748bn) will be sold there, the two firms said at the Singapore air show.

The region is emerging as the world's largest air transport market, ahead of the US and Europe, they predicted.

Globally, some 25,000 aircraft worth $3.1 trillion will be sold in the next 20 years, Airbus forecasts.

Valuable customers

By numbers, airlines in the Asia-Pacific region are expected to buy slightly less than a third of the aircraft produced during the period, according to Boeing.

John Leahy, Airbus chief operating officer
This will see airlines from the region account for over 40% of twin-aisle deliveries and more than 50% of the demand for very large aircraft, such as the A380
John Leahy, chief operating officer, Airbus

However, by value their share will be greater since they are expected to favour large planes to serve the main routes within the region.

"We think that the Asia-Pacific region will definitely lead in the recovery we see in aviation," said Randy Tinseth, vice president for marketing at Boeing.

"Long term, this is the biggest potential market in terms of demand of any region in the world; 31% of all units, 35% of value."

This bodes well for Airbus, which is hoping for brisk sales of its giant A380 aircraft.

"This will see airlines from the region account for over 40% of twin-aisle deliveries and more than 50% of the demand for very large aircraft, such as the A380," said John Leahy, chief operating officer at Airbus.

Airbus and Boeing presented slightly different forecasts. Airbus said 8,000 planes worth $1.2 trillion would be sold in the Asia-Pacific region over the next 20 years. Boeing said 8,900 planes worth $1.1 trillion would be sold.



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