Page last updated at 18:32 GMT, Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Youth bear brunt of recession

The number of young people out of work has risen by 6,000, reaching a total of 952,000, the latest figures show. In the past year, job losses among young people have risen faster than any other section of the working population.

The rate of unemployment among young people for the three months to October was 18.4%, the highest since records began in this category in 1992.

October 2008

% of 18-24-year-olds claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for more than six months, by parliamentary constituency

October 2008
October 2008

January 2009

% of 18-24-year-olds claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for more than six months, by parliamentary constituency

January 2009
January 2009

April 2009

% of 18-24-year-olds claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for more than six months, by parliamentary constituency

April 2009
April 2009

July 2009

% of 18-24-year-olds claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for more than six months, by parliamentary constituency

July 2009
July 2009

October 2009

% of 18-24-year-olds claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for more than six months, by parliamentary constituency

October 2009
October 2009

The maps show how the number of young people looking for work over the past year has increased.

The figures shown are the percentage of 18 to 24-year-olds who have been claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for more than six months. They are updated month-on-month, while unemployment figures assess quarterly changes.

The numbers claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for more than six months fell slightly from 103,400 in October to 94,230 in November, perhaps reflecting the rise in temporary jobs as Christmas approaches.

Claimant count figures are lower than unemployment figures because they count only those people who are out of work and claiming Jobseeker's Allowance.

So, if a person is out of work and looking for a job but not claiming Jobseeker's Allowance for any reason (for example they may not want to, or they may not be eligible to claim it), they will appear in the figure for unemployment, but not the figure for claimant count.

Youth unemployment graph

The figures used on the maps are not seasonally adjusted, so, for example, people taking on Christmas jobs will be reflected in a drop in the claimant count at the beginning of the year.

Since January, the numbers of young claimants have steadily risen.

Areas which have been particularly badly hit include those parts of the country where unemployment has traditionally been a problem for all age groups, such as north and south Wales, Northern Ireland, and urban areas including Liverpool and Birmingham.

Some experts had expected youth unemployment to reach one million in October. The government will be hoping the slowdown in the rise in unemployment means that milestone will not now be reached.



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