Page last updated at 09:53 GMT, Friday, 9 October 2009 10:53 UK

Websites 'need to pay for news'

Rupert Murdoch
Mr Murdoch has already said he plans to charge visitors to his websites

Rupert Murdoch has said it is time for internet search engines and other websites to start to pay for any news reports they currently take for free.

Mr Murdoch, owner of media giant News Corporation, said such sites would soon have to pay for any content taken from his firm's many news providers.

He was speaking at the World Media Summit in Beijing, where his comments were backed by some of his competitors.

Associated Press boss Tom Curley said news providers were being "exploited".

'Act decisively'

"The aggregators and plagiarists will soon have to pay a price for the co-opting of our content," said Mr Murdoch, whose company owns newspapers including the Sun and the Times in the UK, and the New York Post and Wall Street Journal in the US.

"If we do not take advantage of the current movement toward paid content, it will be the content creators - the people in this hall - who will pay the ultimate price and the content kleptomaniacs who triumph."

The BBC's Chris Hogg said Mr Murdoch warned global news executives who had gathered for the summit that many news providers faced going out of business unless they started to charge websites such as Google, Yahoo and Facebook for carrying their content.

We will no longer tolerate the disconnect between people who devote themselves - at great human and economic cost - to gathering news of public interest and those who profit from it without supporting it
AP boss Tom Curley

Mr Murdoch's comments came two months after he said online readers would soon have to pay to access news content across New Corporation's websites.

Mr Curley said news content creators had "been too slow to react to the free exploitation of news by third parties without input or permission".

"Crowd-sourcing web services such as Wikipedia, YouTube and Facebook, have become preferred customer destinations for breaking news, displacing websites of traditional news publishers," he added.

Mr Curley said news providers had to "decisively act to take back control of our content".

"We will no longer tolerate the disconnect between people who devote themselves - at great human and economic cost - to gathering news of public interest and those who profit from it without supporting it."

Mr Curley said earlier this week that Associated Press was considering selling news stories to some websites, such as Google or Yahoo, exclusively for a certain period, such as half an hour.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Will making the Standard free pay off?
02 Oct 09 |  Business
News Corp closes Asian magazine
22 Sep 09 |  Business
Murdoch and Berlusconi in ad spat
17 Sep 09 |  Business
Murdoch attack on 'dominant' BBC
29 Aug 09 |  Business
Closure looms for London paper
20 Aug 09 |  Business
Is free news a thing of the past?
06 Aug 09 |  Business

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific