Page last updated at 22:28 GMT, Friday, 25 September 2009 23:28 UK

The G20: Thoughts from a summit

The gathering in Pittsburgh this week means different things to different people.

For some it is one of the most important of their career, for others a chance to protest or merely an annoying cause of the homeward bound traffic.

But what do people in Pittsburgh - both visitors and residents alike - make of it all?

CAITLIN WOODSON, COFFEE SHOP MANAGER
Pittsburgh coffee shop manager, Caitlin Woodson

I wish we did not have to board up all our windows - I don't think it should be necessary.

There are better ways to protest than smashing our windows!

But it is great they chose Pittsburgh for the G20, and I hope that more good will come of it in the future.

LUKE RAVENSTAHL, MAYOR OF PITTSBURGH

It is wonderful for Pittsburgh - I am honoured that the president chose us for the G20.

It allows us to showcase our successes and reintroduce Pittsburgh to the world.

I am honoured that - as mayor - I get the opportunity to tell Pittsburgh's story.

I am the city's biggest cheerleader!

JOSE MANUEL BARROSO, PRESIDENT OF THE EU
The President of the EU, Jose Manuel Barroso

Delivery is the key word.

We agreed on the principles in London, but now we need delivery on financial regulation and supervision.

We need to do our best to create a level playing field.

PATRICIA LERNER, GREENPEACE SENIOR POLITICAL ADVISER

The leaders of developed countries at the G20 have a choice: break the climate talks deadlock by providing finance - or not.

TINA MIDILI AND RONALD COLMAN, DELEGATION DRIVERS
Drivers for the Canadian delegation, Tina Midili and Ronald Colman

Ronald: For me, the G20 means money!

I already put all of Wednesday's pay towards next year's cruise!

Tina: The city is weird right now- eerie and quiet.

NGOZI OKONJO-IWEALA, WORLD BANK MANAGING DIRECTOR

This G20 is significant because the developing world is increasingly being seen as an important voice that must be heard.

Not just because it is the right thing to do in terms of addressing the issues of poor countries, but because it is the smart thing to do in terms of building sustained global economic growth.

MARLO BARRERA, STUDENT AND G20 PROTESTOR
Student and protestor, Marlo Barrera

It is unacceptable that the top 20 countries get to decide what is best for the rest of the world.

That is why I am protesting.

I am also angry at the way people are being treated by the police.

WAYNE SWAN, AUSTRALIAN TREASURER (FINANCE MINISTER)

We are bringing the major global economies together here.

It is historic - and a long overdue step.



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