Page last updated at 10:42 GMT, Monday, 11 May 2009 11:42 UK

Action promised on blacklisting

Construction workers
A blacklist in the construction industry was discovered in March

The government is to introduce regulations to outlaw secret blacklists that stop union members getting jobs.

In March, construction companies were accused of subscribing to a database with details of workers' trade union activity and employment history.

That blacklist was suspended under existing data protection laws but the government wants specific regulations to make prosecutions easier.

It had considered bringing in such laws as early as 2003.

At the time, no action was taken because no hard evidence could be found that secret blacklists were being used.

But earlier this year, the information commissioner said a firm called the Consulting Association had been flagging up workers who had raised safety concerns or who had union links.

'Shady practices'

"There is already legal protection against the misuse of people's personal details," said Business Secretary Lord Mandelson.

"We now plan to strengthen the law by introducing new regulations to outlaw the compilation, dissemination and use of blacklists in this way."

A consultation process will begin in June. The government hopes new regulations will go to Parliament for approval in October or November and be introduced shortly after that.

Brendan Barber, general secretary of the TUC, welcomed the government's announcement.

"It is outrageous that unscrupulous employers have been victimising trade unionists through shady blacklisting practices that have no place in a democratic society," he said.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Trade in blacklists 'was illegal'
06 Mar 09 |  Today
Deal to end offshore blacklisting
25 Feb 09 |  North East/N Isles

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific