Page last updated at 15:20 GMT, Friday, 23 January 2009

Obama says stimulus deal on track

President Barack Obama
Mr Obama says he wants the plan to gain Republican support

President Barack Obama has said that Congress is on target to approve his planned $825bn (608bn) economic stimulus package by 16 February.

His comments came after he met with Democrat and Republican leaders.

While the legislation is expected to face a relatively easy passage - due to the Democrats' majority in both houses - Mr Obama wants bipartisan support.

Various parts of the $825bn (608bn) package have already been passed by House of Representatives committees.

President Obama said the US was facing an "unprecedented economic crisis" that had to be dealt with quickly.

'Working hard'

"Yes we wrote the bill, yes we won the election," said Democrats leader and House Speak Nancy Pelosi.

I recognize that there are still some difference around the table and between the administration and members of Congress about particular details on the plan
President Barack Obama

"But that doesn't mean we don't want it to have sustainability and bipartisan support, and the president is working hard to get that done."

Ms Pelosi reiterated the president's position that the bill would get to him by 16 February.

Despite Ms Pelosi's comments, some Republicans have accused the Democrats of "barrelling ahead without any bipartisan support".

Republicans claim the president's package is too expensive and doesn't create enough jobs.

Mr Obama said that while he was confident the bill would be delivered, he recognised that some opposition remained.

"I recognize that there are still some difference around the table and between the administration and members of Congress about particular details on the plan," he said.

The bill is currently being scrutinised by Congressional committees.

On Thursday, the ways and means committee approved the $275bn in planned tax cuts, with the 24 Democrats on the committee voting for the proposal, while the 13 Republicans voted against.

Another part of the bill, the call for spending $2.8bn on increased broadband services has passed through the energy and commerce committee.

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