Page last updated at 06:51 GMT, Tuesday, 21 October 2008 07:51 UK

Tech firms warn of lower profits

Texas Instruments HQ
TI is a top supplier of microchips for mobile phones

Texas Instruments (TI) and computer hardware maker Sun Microsystems have both warned of lower future profits.

Based on recent weak order trends, TI said it now expected earnings per share of 30-36 cents in the last three months of 2008, below forecasts.

The warning came as the chip firm reported quarterly net income of $563m, down from $776m last year.

Sun Microsystems warned it would report a wider-than-expected loss in the final quarter of the year.

As most industries suffer from the global squeeze on credit and a consumer slowdown, so many technology firms are feeling the effects from a drop in demand.

Streamlining

"Our outlook for the fourth quarter is for revenue to decline substantially based on weak order trends over the past few months," said Rich Templeton, TI chairman, president and chief executive.

As a result, the Dallas-based firm said it had aggressively reduced inventory and would continue to do so until the end of the year.

TI also said it was in talks to sell part of its business of making wireless chips - the division that makes off-the-shelf chips for mobile phone handsets.

It said the move would help it cut costs by more than $200m a year.

The Dallas-based firm said it would focus on investing in custom-design chips, which are used in many smartphones.

Separately, Sun said it expected to report a net loss for the final three months of 2008 of 25-35 cents a share, surprising analysts who had expected the firm to post a net loss of 16 cents a share.

"Sun and its customers are seeing the impact of a slowing economy," said chief executive Jonathan Schwartz in a prepared statement.




SEE ALSO
Slowing economy hits chipmaker TI
22 Jul 08 |  Business
Sun Micro to cut up to 2,500 jobs
02 May 08 |  Business

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