Page last updated at 05:33 GMT, Friday, 17 October 2008 06:33 UK

Food price rises 'slowing down'

vegetables in shopping basket
Fruit and vegetable prices have fallen recently

Food price rises have started to slow after climbing steeply earlier this year, a survey for the BBC has shown.

Prices rose 9% in the nine months to September, but slowed between August and September to increase just 0.6%.

Some prices have now begun to fall - such as meat and fish and fruit and vegetables.

However the research group Verdict, which carried out the survey for the BBC, said the prices of some household foods were still rising strongly.

'Good harvest'

Neil Saunders of Verdict said the fact that price rises were not as sharp as they had been was down to several factors.

"There has been a good global harvest this year which has brought down the price of wheat," he said.

Many food retailers have been reacting to the trend of consumers switching to cheaper products, by introducing their own discounted brands.

The survey showed that in the year to September, fresh fruit and vegetable prices rose 7.9%, but between August and September they fell by 5.9%.

Meat and fish prices also rose 18.1% in the year to September, but fell 3.9% between August and September.

However overall there are not likely to be major price falls, because there are still problems with global food supplies, the study said.





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