Page last updated at 12:47 GMT, Tuesday, 5 August 2008 13:47 UK

School costs rising says report

School sign
The school run has become more expensive, the report says

The cost of sending a child to school in the UK has risen to 1,077 a year, according to a report by the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR).

Rising food prices have hit the cost of meals and petrol prices have made the school run more expensive.

The costs rose by 2.3% in the year to June - the biggest percentage rise for 10 years, the report claimed.

Families now spend 10.5bn a year on school essentials, with low-income families hardest hit by rising costs.

Breakdown

School meals accounted for the biggest chunk of the spending, at 388 a year for each child, the report says.

This was followed by 266 for the cost of school uniforms, and 207 for sports kits.

Money spent on school trips reached 79 a year for each child, and the school run set parents back 66.

"It is important for retailers like us to understand the real financial pressures that are facing UK families, particularly when families do not have the choice to opt out, like sending their children to school," said Andy Bond, chief executive of Asda, which commissioned the report.

The cost of sending children to independent schools has risen, according to recent unconnected report. The majority of England's top private schools raised fees above the level of inflation this year.


SEE ALSO
Tories attack school poverty gap
04 Aug 08 |  Education
Primary 'free school meals' call
25 Jul 08 |  Education

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