Page last updated at 10:40 GMT, Wednesday, 16 July 2008 11:40 UK

Current account debate in numbers

Wallet
Nearly 90% of the UK adult population have a current account

Personal bank accounts are "not working well" for customers, a report by the Office of Fair Trading says.

But a banking group has responded by saying that the industry is competitive.

With nearly 90% of the UK adult population having at least one current account, the discussions between the industry and the watchdog will be closely watched by consumers.

Here are some of the key numbers contained in the report and used in the debate.


64 million: The number of personal bank accounts in the UK, of which about 54 million are estimated to be active.

£2.6bn: The amount the OFT claims UK banks are making by charging those with insufficient amounts in their account.

£4.1bn: The revenue made by banks in net credit interest, according to the OFT.

11,000: The number of bank branches the industry says it needs money to run.

£152: The amount the OFT says the banks made from each active bank account in 2006, a figure the British Bankers' Association (BBA) says is "slightly contrived".

80% plus: The proportion of customers, the BBA says, who do not pay up-front for their current account - a position unlike many other countries.

12.6 million: The number of accounts - 23% of active current accounts - that incurred an overdraft charge in 2006, the OFT says. The report adds that these accounts were more likely to incur six charges than just one.

One in five: The number of consumers asked in a survey who were unaware of the existence of charges until they had incurred one.

1.4 million: Accounts that incurred charges of more than £500 in 2006.

88%: This proportion of accounts had an annual interest rate of less than 0.5% in 2006.

47%: Consumers who stated that they have never considered switching accounts, according to the OFT.

6%: The proportion of people who have switched current accounts in the past 12 months, according to the OFT. This, it says, is one of the lowest switching rates in Europe.


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