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David Smith, Lex Transfleet
If people shop online, what will they do with their cars?
 real 28k

Wednesday, 16 February, 2000, 14:30 GMT
Internet sales 'will jam roads'

Traffic jam Could roads get even busier?


The growth of traffic on the internet could lead to more traffic on the roads, a new report suggests.

As more people use online shopping sites, residential areas could become clogged with delivery vehicles.

"In terms of traffic volume, it will ultimately lead to more congestion and pollution caused by the increase in goods vehicles," said David Smith of Lex Transfleet, which produced the report in conjunction with the Freight Transport Association.

"Without co-operation, especially between smaller retailers on delivery systems and vehicle specification, home shopping does not represent a sustainable solution."

The findings came in a wide-ranging report on the major issues affecting the freight industry.

Woman surfing net One-third of people shop from home
It showed that one-third of people in Britain currently use the internet or telephone for home shopping and this figure is predicted to rise significantly.

Almost a third of those interviewed said they believed home shopping would reduce traffic congestion and pollution.

But only 22% said they would support the practice if it led to an increase in the number of goods vehicles.

About 40% said they would oppose an increase in this type of trade if it meant more freight traffic.

Mr Smith said: "Distribution firms must also look at sharing information to achieve higher levels of efficiency, otherwise there will be a sharp rise in the volume of traffic on residential streets that were simply not designed for, and cannot take, goods vehicle deliveries."

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E-commerce
Is it really the future and how will it change your life?

See also:
16 Sep 99 |  Wales
UK online shopping doubles
19 Jan 00 |  UK
Cruising the net for cut-price cars
04 Aug 99 |  The Economy
The e-commerce revolution

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