[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Monday, 19 April, 2004, 22:30 GMT 23:30 UK
Coke cutting back on the calories
Coke cans
Coke's new C2 version will be halfway between regular and Diet
Coca-Cola is launching a half the sugar, half the calories version of its famous soft drink.

The new product, to be named Coca-Cola C2, will sit halfway between the fully loaded original and the sugar-free Diet Coke.

Coca-Cola chief executive Doug Daft said "customers were the true architects of this idea", which had been a year in the making.

The new version will be launched first in Japan, then the US, this summer.

"Coca-Cola C2 was created to specifically address their desire for a lower-calorie cola with that great Coca-Cola taste," Mr Daft added.

Cola wars

It follows after rival Pepsi announced the launch of a similar product - Pepsi Edge - also in the summer.

Some analysts believe both companies face a challenge to make the new products a success.

"There is an unblemished record of failure for products with half-measures," said Tom Pirko, president of consultancy Bevmark.

"You clutter your marketing and create confusion. It is an uphill slog no matter what you put in it."

Consumers, he added, usually just "expect an either/or proposition."




SEE ALSO:
Coke slims for female customers
14 Apr 04  |  Business
Coke recalls controversial water
19 Mar 04  |  Business
Coke song site 'Europe's biggest'
11 Mar 04  |  Entertainment
Coke music site finally launches
20 Jan 04  |  Entertainment
Coke may can school adverts
20 Nov 03  |  Education
Coke pays off whistleblower
08 Oct 03  |  Business


RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia
UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature | Technology | Health
Have Your Say | In Pictures | Week at a Glance | Country Profiles | In Depth | Programmes
Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific