BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Business  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
E-Commerce
Economy
Market Data
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 30 January, 2003, 06:30 GMT
Murdoch China deal could cut piracy
Mr Murdoch with his third wife, Wendi Deng
Murdoch is married to former Chinese TV executive Wendi Deng
Phoenix Satellite TV, one of media mogul Rupert Murdoch's Chinese joint ventures, has signed a deal with a Chinese state broadcaster which could help it crack down on the country's rampant piracy.

Phoenix's deal with the state broadcaster in Guangdong, the affluent southern province abutting Hong Kong, means the two will share the channel's advertising revenues, a Phoenix spokesman said.

But, he added, it would also mean the Chinese state gets an extra incentive to crack down on the piracy which dogs Chinese broadcasting.

Private firms routinely strip the adverts off the satellite signal and then rebroadcast it with their own adverts, a process known as "ad splicing".

Problems

Phoenix has legal access to 42 million households through state-run cable networks, but has no estimate of how many more may be watching through hacked broadcasts, the spokesman said.

The ad splicing problem is particularly acute for Hong Kong-based broadcasters, analysts say, costing them billions of Hong Kong dollars a year.

The company is 38% owned by News Corp, Mr Murdoch's main corporate vehicle. Another 38% belongs to a former propagandist for the People's Liberation Army.

It broadcasts three channels to mainland China, including a news channel only given permission to operate late last year.

Access

The deal is by no means the first for News Corp with a regional state broadcaster.

It became the first foreign broadcaster to be allowed to beam its programmes onto the mainland last year with a deal with Hunan's provincial broadcaster, although the deal was about content swaps rather than advertising money.

And his Star Group is already broadcasting direct to Guangdong.

The Star channels have been established in China for some years, following News Corp's decision to drop BBC news channels after Chinese government complaints solidified Mr Murdoch's position as a man the government could do business with.

See also:

20 Dec 02 | Business
23 Oct 02 | Business
20 Dec 01 | Entertainment
03 Dec 01 | Business
06 Sep 01 | Business
16 Jul 01 | Entertainment
28 Mar 01 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes