BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Business  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
E-Commerce
Economy
Market Data
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 22 November, 2002, 01:13 GMT
T-mobile warning over masts
Mobile phone masts
Campaigners say there are health risks
A leading mobile phone firm is warning the quality of services will go down if further mobile mast construction is hampered by campaigners.

T-Mobile, formerly One to One, says increased mobile phone usage has generated the need for more masts.

But campaigners say there remain questions over whether there are health risks associated with the masts.

Residents in many areas have been fervent in their opposition to the siting of antennae near homes or schools.

Mobile phone
Mobile usage is still rising
But T-mobile has now taken on a more strident tone in its attitude to new masts.

It says if mast construction is halted or slowed, services will suffer.

The volume of mobile phone calls and text messages is expected to grow by 25% over the next three years and that is not taking into account the new third generation services.

But campaigners from the pressure group Powerwatch say that given public health fears, more controls on mast construction are needed.

Residents groups have suggested that until more is known about the effects low-level RF radiation may be having on the long-term health of children, mast construction should be limited in certain areas.

Many have also been angered about the placing of masts on low-level sites which do not require planning permission, and can be put up without protest.

Masts sited at petrol stations, churches, fire stations and particularly schools, have caused anger.

But mobile phone firms point to studies suggesting that masts near schools are well within international standards on electromagnetic emissions.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Hugh Pym
"Now T-Mobile is throwing down the gauntlet"
See also:

16 Sep 02 | dot life
06 Aug 02 | Politics
11 Apr 02 | N Ireland
23 Jul 01 | Scotland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes