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Friday, 8 November, 2002, 23:56 GMT
Microsoft appoints internal watchdog
Microsoft headquarters in Redmond
The US government has accepted the settlement
Computer software giant Microsoft plans to set up a committee to oversee its compliance with requirements set by a US district court in its landmark anti-trust case.

Microsoft's announcement comes as the US government accepted on Friday a modified agreement set by the court last week to end the case against Microsoft.


Microsoft has moved rapidly to fulfil our responsibilities here

Bill Gates
This means that the government and Microsoft have both agreed to changes made by District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly.

A court decision last week rejected a plea for tougher restrictions on Microsoft from a group of US states.

Some critics have said this now gives Microsoft more power to extend its monopoly.

However, even some of the states making the plea eventually agreed that Judge Kollar-Kotelly improved the settlement.

Keeping Microsoft in check

Microsoft said it has appointed a Harvard business school professor to head its committee to comply with last week's ruling.

The professor James Cash already serves as a Microsoft board member.

"Microsoft has moved rapidly to fulfil our responsibilities here," said Microsoft chairman Bill Gates.

"We recognize that we will be closely scrutinized by the government and our competitors.

"We will devote all the time, energy and resources needed to meet our new obligations."

Mr Cash added: "This committee will take its responsibilities very seriously, and is committed to meeting the obligations outlined in the court's final judgment."


The settlement

Appeal court ruling

Appeal hearing

Analysis
See also:

02 Nov 02 | Business
01 Nov 02 | Business
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