BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Business  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
E-Commerce
Economy
Market Data
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 23 September, 2002, 17:57 GMT 18:57 UK
Africa woos workers back home
The Commonwealth Business Council has launched a new initiative to reverse Africa's brain drain by attracting professionals back home.

"There is a significant interest among young professionals of African origin to return to live and work in Africa," said Funto Akinkugbe, head of the council's AfricaRecruit scheme.


Africa's economic development requires that the historical brain drain be reversed into a brain gain

Funto Akinkugbe
AfricaRecruit
"But the problem is they don't have a clue where to start looking for a job," Mr Akinkugbe told BBC News Online.

The council will operate the FindaJobinAfrica.com website and organise a series of job fairs to showcase the opportunities that are open to businesspeople in Africa.

Africa will gain a new generation of graduates who understand the mindset of western business but who do not seek to impose their values, he explained.

Past problems

Doctor Titi Lola Banjoko, chief executive of Find A Job in Africa told the BBC's World Business Report that the loss of trained workers through emigration was a gradual process that started in the 1980s.

Economic and political pressures caused a lot of trained workers to leave and wars in the region also played a part.

But now Ms Banjoko believes the situation is improving and that many professionals do now wish to return home.

The problem of nepotism, which once deterred workers from returned home, has subsided as companies have been privatised and exposed to more competition, she explained.

"Africa's economic development requires that the historical brain drain be reversed into a brain gain," Mr Akinkugbe said at the launch of the scheme.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Doctor Titi Lola Banjoko, Find a Job in Africa
"I can assure you nepotism is a thing of the past"
See also:

24 Jul 02 | Africa
17 Oct 01 | Africa
16 Feb 01 | Africa
23 Sep 02 | Business
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes