BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Business  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
E-Commerce
Economy
Market Data
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 2 September, 2002, 15:59 GMT 16:59 UK
Sudan plans Nile dam
Sudanese landscape with Nile River
The new dam will stop flooding and improve irrigation
Sudan is preparing to short-list companies to build a $1.73bn dam on the Nile in the country's north to provide more electricity and cut flooding.

The Hamdab Dam in Merowe, about 400 km (250 miles) north of Khartoum, will triple electricity generation in Sudan, Mutaz Musa Abdalla Salim, finance director for the dam project told Reuters

Khartoum, Sudan
Khartoum suffers black-outs daily
He said the government would next month short-list four firms from 69 to submit final bids to build the $650m dam wall.

Seven companies are competing to build the electricity turbines and generators at a cost of $700m.

The dam is expected to be finished in about six years' time.

The economy of Sudan, Africa's largest country by landmass and one of its poorest, has stalled during a 19-year-old civil war, with oil revenues providing one of the few sources of income.

Power hungry

The combined electricity generation from thermal and hydroelectric sources is up to 500 megawatts (MW), while daily demand is estimated at about 1000 MW.

The Rosairis dam, also on the Nile, generates about 280 MW, but this often drops to half due to poor water flows in late winter and early summer when the waters are at their lowest.

Khartoum's market
Most market traders have generators
Flooding often clogs the dams turbines with silt and river flotsam.

"Merowe, with 10 turbines compared to Roseires seven turbines, will increase power production in the factories and create more job opportunities," he said.

The new dam will have a capacity of 1,250 MW.

Power black-outs are a common occurrence in Sudan, crippling businesses which cannot afford their own generators and pushing up operational costs for those that can.

Nearly all shops in the capital Khartoum's central market have their own generators.

Environmental cost

Resettlement and environmental costs are expected to total a further $375m, Mr Salim said, adding it would improve navigation and fishing opportunities on the Nile.

"The Merowe Dam will hold back water and the areas downstream will no longer experience floods," he added.

About 50,000 people will be resettled.

Mr Salim said it would take four to five years relocated about 600 families, most of whom had agreed to a compensation package.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Jeremy Bird, UN Environment Programme
"On the social side resettlement is seen as the biggest problem."
See also:

12 Aug 02 | Science/Nature
12 Aug 02 | Business
19 Mar 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes