BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Business  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
E-Commerce
Economy
Market Data
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 29 August, 2002, 13:16 GMT 14:16 UK
Berlin's airport plan set for take-off
A German consortium is poised to sign up to build a 1.7bn euro (1.09bn euro; $1.67bn) new airport in Berlin, ending a long-running saga.

A building consortium and city authorities are expected to clinch the deal on Friday.

Hochtief, Germany's largest building group, and property firm IVG Holding will bear the building costs of the airport, and pay Berlin and the state of Brandenburg 290m euros for the right to run it.


The airport is a gateway to a better economic future in our region

Hartmann Kleiner, managing director, UVB
In return, the firms will gain a 99-year lease on an airport big enough to replace the three smaller hubs serving Berlin, and which is expected to serve at least 20 million passengers a year by 2011.

News of the contract signing, which will kick off one of the largest infrastructure projects in Europe, was welcomed by Berlin business leaders.

"Industry expects that Berlin, Brandenburg, the federal government, as well as the consortium will do everything to make sure a final contract is signed successfully," said Hartmann Kleiner, managing director of the UVB business association.

"The airport is a gateway to a better economic future in our region."

Experience showed that every extra 1 million passengers carried led to the creation of 2,500 jobs, Mr Kleiner added.

Three in one

German unification in 1990 left Berlin with three airports - Tegel and Tempelhof, which was famous for its role during the 1948 blockade, and Schoenefeld, which served the former communist East Berlin.

But while there has long been agreement on the need to rationalise operations at a single site, progress has snagged over project details.

The new airport, named Berlin-Brandenburg, will be built on the Schoenefeld site, and will be served by infrastructure for which the state is putting up 600m euros in support.

The Tegel and Tempelhof sites are scheduled to shut in 2008, when Berlin-Brandenburg opens, although there has been speculation the closure could be delayed until 2011.

Tempelhof was four years ago the site of celebrations, attended by then US president Bill Clinton, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Berlin blockade.

Between June 1948 and May 1949, 300,000 flights were made to Berlin, delivering 3 million tons of supplies, as Stalinist Russia masterminded a plan which cut the city's land links to Western nations.

See also:

11 Aug 02 | Business
25 Jun 02 | Business
19 Mar 02 | Europe
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes