BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Business  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
E-Commerce
Economy
Market Data
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 5 July, 2002, 11:15 GMT 12:15 UK
Call for shorter Fridays
Stressed man
Some people cannot stop thinking about work, even at weekends
The majority of us are stressed, work longer than a 35-hour week - and nearly half of us regularly do unpaid overtime, a survey has revealed.

Most people also never take a proper lunch break, and one in 10 does not even take a holiday.

Even when we do get a break - at the weekend - we cannot stop thinking about that unfinished paperwork or the next week's confrontation with the boss.

Umist-based organisational psychologist Professor Cary Cooper has launched a campaign in conjunction with online travel site Opodo to get people to take a break and "clock off early on Fridays".

"Nearly half of the respondents thought that their bosses would allow them to leave early on Fridays if it meant they worked more productively," Mr Cooper said.

"Employers need to give their staff the chance to prove this is a viable option."

Friday feeling

People also felt their personal relationships would improve if they had longer weekends.


People simply aren't going to be productive if they don't get a long enough break and are so stressed that they still can't switch off

Professor Cary Cooper

Whether a shorter Friday would lead to a stress-free weekend, however, is another matter.

According to the survey, 55% of people are unable to switch off at weekends.

Worst affected are people who work more than 60 hours during the week, three-quarters of whom spend much of their weekend thinking about work.

"Employers have seriously got their head in the sand if they don't take immediate action," Mr Cooper said.

"People simply aren't going to be productive if they don't get a long enough break and are so stressed that they still can't switch off."

See also:

13 Jun 02 | Business
09 Jun 02 | Scotland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes