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Tuesday, 25 June, 2002, 13:19 GMT 14:19 UK
G8 security fuels protesters' anger
Delta lodge
Splendid isolation for leaders at the Delta Lodge
There is a world-weary resignation in the chanting of protesters gathering for the G8 summit in the remote town of Kananaskis, about a 90-minute drive west of Calgary.

The leaders they are meeting here in June
They will put themselves inside a small platoon
But although they talk about democracy
They might as well be meeting on the moon

security
Security checkpoints keep protesters at bay
Calgary is as close they have been allowed to get and there is no chance yet of actually taking their message up the road which is punctuated with at least 13 checkpoints.

The Canadian police have mounted one of their most intensive security operations, with an estimated 2,800 employed to keep the G8 delegates isolated from the protesters.

And that is just the way Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien wants it.

John Klassen, executive director of the summit, told the BBC: "The prime minister wanted to find a place to do it differently to past summits.


I would really like to see this as an opportunity to start ending the cycle of violence of the past summits

Calgary Mayor Dave Bronconnier
"We wanted a place where the leaders can be together and you don't have to drive anywhere, you just walk.

"It's a more informal setting, a more relaxed setting."

Violent protests at G8 summits which culminated in the death last year of a protester in Genoa, Italy, prompted the security clampdown in Canada.

Angry activists

And the summit venue, Delta Lodge, deep in the Kananaskis valley, is possibly one of the quietest and remotest venues possible.

protest
Protests have been peaceful so far
Activists gathering for the summit are angry that f the leaders who will be making decisions without any input from them.

But for Calgary Mayor Dave Bronconnier, that is just the way he wants it.

"I would really like to see this as an opportunity to start ending the cycle of violence of the past summits, he said.

"I think its important that protesters get their message out, but it must be a very peaceful protest.

"The violence we have seen at previous summits is unacceptable in my view."

And for now, the tough line from the authorities appears to be working, at least for them.

The first big protest was held on Sunday when more than 2,500 protesters took to the streets.

But the mood was party-like in the summer sunshine and there were no arrests.


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27 Jul 01 | In Depth
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