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Tuesday, 18 December, 2001, 16:16 GMT
DaimlerChrysler cuts German jobs
DaimlerChrysler's headquarter
The company will not make compulsory redundancies
Between 5,000 and 6,000 German jobs will be lost next year when the car and truck maker DaimlerChrysler pushes its massive programme of job cuts beyond the US.

DaimlerChrysler Chairman Juergen Schrempp
Chairman Juergen Schrempp has cut 18,000 jobs in a year
There, tough cutbacks have already slashed 30,000 jobs from its payroll.

This has been largely due to cut-backs at its Chrysler car unit and its Freightliner truck unit where up to 18,000 jobs have been lost.

In addition, the sales of its Adtranz and Temic units have cut its payroll.

In the last year, the company has reduced its global workforce from 416,500 staff to 376,300.

And "it looks as if this number will be slightly lower in 2002", said the man in charge of personnel affairs, Guenther Fleigh, who is also a member of the group's board.

DaimlerChrysler employs 191,300 people in Germany.

Not compulsory

But the job cuts should not result in any German workers losing their jobs against their will.


In the cars business, it would not be wise to cut production now and have insufficient capacity later

Guenther Fleigh
Board member in charge of personnel affairs
"We do not foresee compulsory redundancies in 2002 [in Germany]," said Mr Fleigh.

"We think the economic decline will normalise in 2002."

The group's German operations' "flexible working models" should enable it to weather the ongoing economic downturn, the group said.

In its truck division, which includes eight plants in Germany, the company might reduce its current 35-hour-week to a 30-hour-week.

And its car division is unlikely to escape untouched.

"In the cars business, it would not be wise to cut production now and have insufficient capacity later," said Mr Fleigh.

Last week, Chrysler president Dieter Zetsche said he had no plans to cut any more jobs.

See also:

23 Oct 01 | Business
DaimlerChrysler cheers markets
12 Oct 01 | Business
DaimlerChrysler cuts truck jobs
20 Jul 01 | Business
DaimlerChrysler beats expectations
10 Oct 01 | Business
Daimler challenges record EU fine
16 Sep 01 | Business
US motor industry suffers shortages
25 Apr 01 | Business
DaimlerChrysler falls into the red
26 Feb 01 | Business
DaimlerChrysler axes Mitsubishi jobs
23 Feb 01 | Business
DaimlerChrysler to restructure
29 Jan 01 | Business
DaimlerChrysler axes 26,000 jobs
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