BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in: Business
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Market Data 
Economy 
Companies 
E-Commerce 
Your Money 
Business Basics 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Friday, 30 November, 2001, 00:05 GMT
Euro poll shows strong resistance
French butcher displays announcement that the euro will be introduced on 1 January, 2002
The euro introduction will not change people's minds
The opposition to the UK replacing the pound with the euro remains entrenched among the British people, an NOP survey shows.

Sixty per cent of adults would vote against the UK joining the eurozone, and almost half of the no-voters, or 44%, say nothing would make them change their minds, according to the survey.

"Not only are two thirds opposed; a significant number of them seem certain they will not be changing their minds," said Barclays Capital's chief UK economist, David Hillier.

The greatest opposition to the euro can be found in the South East, the North East and in Scotland, according to the survey which had been commissioned by Barclays' investment banking arm.

The people questioned ranked joining the euro ninth of a list of 12 possible priorities by the government.

Referendum

The report quotes other findings which show that a referendum would only achieve a yes-majority in five or 10 years at the earliest.

Wim Duisenberg, European Central Bank president
The British people prefer Bank of England Governor Sir Edward George to the European Central Bank President Wim Duisenberg
Financial markets and investors should build into their models and forecasts the possibility that Britain will remain outside the Euro for far longer than currently expected, Barclays said.

"With a month to go until the introduction of notes and coins on the continent, this poll shows that while the rest of Europe may be [going] full steam ahead, the UK is still some way off joining the Euro," said Mr Hillier.

The introduction of the euro on 1 January 2002 will not have much of an impact on the UK people's views, the survey said.

See also:

23 Nov 01 | UK Politics
Mixed reaction to euro hints
23 Nov 01 | Business
Q&A: Is the UK ready for the euro?
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories