BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Business  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
E-Commerce
Economy
Market Data
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 23 October, 2001, 04:41 GMT 05:41 UK
US tourists stay away from London
The Savoy Hotel in London
Many of London's five-star hotels are only half full
The number of London hotel rooms booked by Americans fell by 45% in September, following the terror attacks in New York and Washington.

Accountancy and business consultancy company PKF also found a 17% overall drop in rooms booked in the capital compared to September last year.

The survey indicates that the situation deteriorated further in October with many five-star establishments reporting they are only half full in what should be one of their strongest months.

Americans are by far the biggest group of overseas visitors to London - but the 11 September suicide hijack attacks have deterred many from travelling.

Jobs jeopardy

More than 250,000 people are employed in the tourism industry in London - but jobs could be in jeopardy if, as many hoteliers fear, the Americans stay away for some time.

The British Tourist Authority has estimated that the UK, whose tourism industry is dependent largely on US trade, could lose 2.5bn in revenue from overseas visitors next year.

But a separate survey published on Monday indicates that the US is the top choice for UK holidaymakers, favoured by more than one in 10 people.

Confidence was highest among experienced business travellers, with more than one in five executives saying they would holiday in the US, the poll, for Marks & Spencer's Financial Services, found.

Married people were more concerned about travelling to the US than single people, with men more likely than women to cite America as their top holiday destination.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones
"The tourists just aren't turning up"
The BBC's Max Foster
reports from the Knightsbridge Green Hotel, in central London
See also:

22 Oct 01 | Business
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes