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Thursday, 30 August, 2001, 09:16 GMT 10:16 UK
Airbus orders tests after Azores crash
An Airbus A330
Airbus planes are being checked for fuel faults
Airbus, Europe's biggest aircraft manufacturer, is asking all the airlines which use its A330 passenger jet to check their planes' fuel lines.

The call comes a week after a Canadian Airbus pilot was forced to fly his plane for more than 100 miles without power before making a forced landing in the Azores.

UK group Rolls-Royce made the Trent 700 series engines fitted to the plane, and has told all aircraft manufacturers using it that a crack in the fuel line - possible as a result of chafing against another pipe - is the most likely cause of the problem.

Airbus, which is owned by the European Aerospace, Defence and Space consortium (EADS) and the UK's BAe Systems in an 80/20 split, has now ordered inspections, which should take about 30 minutes, to be made within 72 hours.

Powerless

The trigger for the checks was the failure of both engines on an Airbus A330-200 operated by Canada's Air Transat and flying from Toronto to Lisbon in Portugal.

Captain Robert Piche, pilot of the stricken Airbus
Cpt Piche landed his Airbus safely after 120 miles without power

On 24 August, the aircraft's crew noticed a fuel leak in the right engine, which within minutes caused it to shut down.

About 13 minutes later, the left engine followed suit, leaving Captain Robert Piche to fly the plane 113 miles to the Azores, in the Atlantic Ocean about 900 miles from Portugal, without power.

He managed to land the plane, bursting nearly all its tyres but keeping it intact.

Of the 293 passengers and 13 crew on board, 11 people suffered slight injuries.

See also:

29 Aug 01 | Americas
Engine shutdown pilot: 'I'm no hero'
09 Aug 01 | Business
EADS and Airbus sales rocket
19 Jun 01 | Business
Boeing bows to Airbus
19 Mar 01 | Business
EADS hopes for profits
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