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Thursday, 24 May, 2001, 12:37 GMT 13:37 UK
Graduates eye 60K salaries
Student at graduation ceremony
High salaries might make all that hard work finally seem worth it
Mobile phone chain Phones 4u is luring the best graduates by offering them starting salaries of up to 60,000 a year.

The group says that it is suffering from a tight recruitment market and is launching its Graduate High Flier Scheme to ensure that the most talented graduates come to its headquarters at Stoke-on-Trent.

The phone firm is owned by multi-millionaire businessman John Caudwell, who is ranked 23rd on the Sunday Times rich list.

The graduates will be charged with helping increase sales to 20bn by 2020. Last year's sales stood at 1bn.

Missed opportunities

"We are missing opportunities in the UK and European markets because we simply cannot recruit exceptional people fast enough," said Mr Caudwell.

The firm examined graduate starting salaries at some well-established companies, and then topped them, in the hope of ensuring applications from top graduates.

The newly recruited staff are expected to have the ambition to become group managing director by the age of 30.

Graduates will initially be paid between 40,000 and 60,000 and will also get a small company car.

The firm says that negotiating for the higher end of the salary will be part of the interviewing process.

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Bright future for graduates
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