BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: Business
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Market Data 
Economy 
Companies 
E-Commerce 
Your Money 
Business Basics 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Thursday, 5 April, 2001, 10:36 GMT 11:36 UK
Cafe firm stirred by foot-and-mouth
Smouldering pyre of animals slaughtered during anti foot-and-mouth campaign
Foot-and-mouth, which has brought a new crisis to UK farms, is affecting other sectors too
Upmarket cafe and restaurant operator Madisons Coffee has become the latest firm to warn it may be hit by the foot-and-mouth outbreak.

Madisons, whose portfolio includes the upmarket Richoux chain, is implementing an action plan to minimise the "adverse financial effects" of the epidemic.

In a statement announcing a pre-tax losses of 640,000 in the second half of 2000, Madisons reported firm sales so far this year from its 48 outlets.

But a prolonged outbreak of foot-and-mouth "would lead to widespread commercial disruption and could significantly affect a number of our raw material food costs", the group warned.

Rising tally

More than 30 listed firms have now warned UK investors that the epidemic will affect profits, or said they have at least reviewed the outbreak's potential impact.

While the companies include agriculturally focused enterprises such as Genus, the world's largest cattle breeding business, firms in sectors such as leisure, publishing and construction have also said that earnings might be hit.

Companies which on Wednesday warned that the disease might impact profits included Jennings, the brewery business which owns 175 pubs in northern England.

Trade in Jennings' rural pubs, representing about half the firm's portfolio, has been "adversely affected" by the fall in tourists to the countryside following the onset of foot-and-mouth, a statement said.

Fishing and cycling

Also, Macdonald Hotels, which operates more than 50 hotels throughout the country, warned that earnings will be "negatively affected" by the epidemic.

And the owner of Leeda, the UK's largest fishing tackle distributor, and the Madison bicycle parts business admitted the epidemic's "significant adverse effect on outdoor sports such as cycling and fishing".

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

22 Mar 01 | Business
Ireland's 'foot-and-mouth' fears
20 Mar 01 | Business
UK economy to ride out farm crisis
06 Mar 01 | Business
Foot-and-mouth 'to hit land prices'
01 Mar 01 | Business
Rising cost of farm crisis
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Business stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Business stories