Languages
Page last updated at 15:53 GMT, Friday, 5 February 2010

Chinese papers react angrily to US 'confrontation'

Taiwan soldiers check a locally-made Tien-Chien missile during an annual drill
US plans to sell more arms to Taiwan have upset China

Chinese newspaper commentaries have spoken out strongly against what they see as a confrontational shift by the United States after an initial "honeymoon" period following President Barack Obama's inauguration.

They criticise the US over numerous friction points, including its ongoing demands to devalue their currency, Mr Obama's intention to meet the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, and planned arms sales to Taiwan.

TANG XUEPENG in GUANGZHOU'S DIERSHIYI SHIJI JINGJI BAODAO

With arms sales to Taiwan, preparations to meet separatists as well as pressure on the renminbi [yuan] exchange rate, Obama seems to have changed overnight his "moderate image" since he assumed office.

FU YIN in BEIJING'S GUANGMING GUANCHA

What is Obama up to? As soon as the New Year started, he disregarded strong opposition from the Chinese government and disregarded the strong opposition of the Chinese people by peddling arms to Taiwan and stubbornly insisting on meeting the separatist Dalai Lama. Obama, remember that the Chinese people - who make up nearly one-quarter of the world's total population - despise you!

SUN ZHE in BEIJING'S GLOBAL TIMES

Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama
China does not want President Obama to meet the Dalai Lama

The Obama administration's deliberate provocations on the most sensitive issues indicate an adjustment of policy toward China. All those moves, carefully calculated, are a clear message that the US will not yield to China's growing assertive stance on critical issues. But the friction will not deteriorate into opposition between the two sides.

SONG GUOYOU in SHANGHAI'S DONGFANG ZAOBAO

The confrontational shift in the USA's China policy will no doubt have a dramatic impact on Sino-US relations. China and the US may go through a difficult period and ensuing developments will also test the political wisdom of the two governments. China must be fully prepared for this.

LI JIAN in BEIJING'S CHINA DAILY

Even if the yuan appreciates, it should be done after the US softens its stance. In November last year, Obama showed goodwill when visiting China. However, only two months ago, the pendulum of US policy swung quickly in the other direction and crushed the seeds of hope that had only just emerged in the minds of the Chinese. In this case, China may have to resort to a large-scale sell-off of US bonds.

YE TAN in SHANGHAI'S MEIRI JINGJI XINWEN

Whenever the US economy faces serious obstacles, the most convenient solution is to find economies with promising growth - formerly Germany and Japan, and now China - and force exchange-rate appreciation in these countries, and consolidate its super economic empire status through a financial war. China is not Japan and it will remain unmoved by the US's repeated force. A freely floating renminbi exchange rate will emerge sooner or later. But the initiative on regulation and control is entirely in China's own hands, and it will not be a puppet of the US dollar like the Japanese yen.

EDITORIAL in HONG KONG'S WEN WEI PO

When Obama assumed office, Sino-US relations were described as entering a "honeymoon period". However, recently, there has been constant friction between China and the US, ranging from the Google incident, arms sales to Taiwan and Obama's insistence on meeting the Dalai Lama, to calls for a tougher stance on trade with China and the renminbi exchange rate issue. All this has cast a shadow over Sino-US relations. The US will pay a heavy price if it intends to engage in a new Cold War with China and regards China as an enemy.

CHEUNG WAH in HONG KONG'S APPLE DAILY

Some angry youth and military hawks are still not satisfied with the rational and strong counter-moves [taken by Beijing] and are determined to make the US experience the ferocity of the Chinese. Ordinary Chinese people can be sent to the West to overwhelm the US and Europe.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
The careful choreography of China-US ties
05 Feb 10 |  Asia-Pacific
US-China relations hit a bad patch
02 Feb 10 |  Americas
China warns Obama over Dalai Lama
02 Feb 10 |  Asia-Pacific
US defends weapons sale to Taiwan
30 Jan 10 |  Americas
US approves Taiwan missile sales
07 Jan 10 |  Asia-Pacific


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific