Languages
Page last updated at 10:11 GMT, Sunday, 6 September 2009 11:11 UK

Six vanish in Korea flood mystery

Advertisement

Military teams search the riverbanks of the Imjin River

Rescue workers in South Korea are looking for six people believed to have been swept away from a campsite in a mysterious flash flood.

Officials say they are investigating whether the surge came from a new dam in North Korea, further up stream.

They say there has been no rainfall recently in the area at Yeoncheon, 60km (37 miles) north-east of Seoul.

More than 1,000 rescue workers are scouring a stretch of the Imjin river, close to the border with the North.

Although the cause of the flood has not been confirmed, the BBC's John Sudworth says concerns have been raised in the past that North Korean dams could cause both droughts and floods in the South, depending on the time of year.

Police said the six South Koreans disappeared early on Sunday from the campsite.

Map locator

Provincial official Choi Kwon-rak said the water level suddenly jumped 2.3m (7.5ft).

A local police official told the AFP news agency that investigators suspected the Hwanggang Dam in North Korea had released a massive volume of water.

The dam has a capacity of 400 million tons of water, according to South Korean government estimates.

Seoul's Unification Ministry, which handles relations with Pyongyang, said it was looking into the incident.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Two Koreas resume border traffic
01 Sep 09 |  Asia-Pacific
Envoys see N Korea mystery site
17 Sep 04 |  Asia-Pacific
Country profile: South Korea
13 Oct 11 |  Country profiles
Country profile: North Korea
29 Sep 11 |  Country profiles


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific