Languages
Page last updated at 14:51 GMT, Sunday, 19 July 2009 15:51 UK

Cloned sniffer dogs begin duties

Cloned sniffer dogs at Seoul's Incheon International Airport on July 17
The Labrador retrievers are genetically identical

South Korea's customs service says it has deployed the "world's first cloned sniffer dogs" to check for drugs at its main airport and border crossings.

Six puppies cloned from a Canadian-born sniffer dog in late 2007 have reported for duty after completing a 16-month training programme.

The clones are all called Toppy, a combination of "tomorrow" and "puppy".

The customs agency says clones help to lower crime-fighting costs as it is difficult to find good sniffer dogs.

Only about 30% of naturally-born sniffer dogs make the grade, but South Korean scientists say that could rise to 90% using the cloning method.

'Better performance'

Advertisement

'World's first cloned sniffer dogs'

The new recruits are part of a litter of seven puppies who were cloned from a "superb" drug-sniffing Canadian Labrador retriever called Chase in 2007, officials said.

One dropped out of the training due to an injury.

"They are the world's first cloned sniffer dogs deployed at work," Park Jeong-Heon, a customs spokesman at Seoul's Incheon International Airport, told AFP news agency.

"They showed better performances in detecting illegal drugs during the training than other naturally-born sniffer dogs that we have."

The cloning work was conducted by a team of scientists at Seoul National University, who created the world's first cloned dog - an Afghan Hound named Snuppy.

The state-funded project cost about 300m won ($239,000; £146,000).



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Firm hails dog clone breakthrough
29 Jan 09 |  Asia-Pacific
S Korea trains sniffer-dog clones
21 Apr 08 |  Asia-Pacific
Sniffer dogs smell something new
01 Nov 07 |  Asia-Pacific
First order for pet dog cloning
15 Feb 08 |  Science & Environment
How can a dog sniff through concrete?
26 Feb 08 |  Magazine

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific