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Page last updated at 04:23 GMT, Thursday, 1 January 2009

South Korea chicken success in NK

By John Sudworth
BBC News, Seoul

Fried chicken from South Korea
Fried chickens have proved good business in North Korea

The governments may not be on the best of terms but a South Korean businessman seems to have found a way to North Koreans' hearts: their stomachs.

Choi Won-ho, the owner of a fried chicken chain, was told he was doomed to fail when he opened his first branch in the impoverished North last year.

But encouraged by his progress so far, he is already preparing to open another one.

Mr Choi runs a fast food franchise in South Korea with a total of 70 stores.

He opened one more last year - no real challenge you might think - except this extension to his fried chicken empire is in the heart of one of the most secretive and business-unfriendly places on the planet.

But Mr Choi says the citizens of Pyongyang have been queuing in front of his shop which is taking around $1,000 a day.

He is now preparing to meet North Korean officials in January to finalise the approval for a second outlet.

His customers are almost certainly all members of North Korea's elite, a country in which the World Food Programme says up to 9m people will face urgent food shortages this winter.

Relations between the two Korea's have been at a low since the conservative government of President Lee Myung-bak came to power in the South in February.

North Korea has severed official contacts, stopped all cross-border tourism and restricted entry to a joint industrial zone built with southern money.

But despite the chill, Mr Choi's fried chicken venture seems to be sizzling.

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