BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Asia-Pacific
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 
Sunday, 4 June, 2000, 07:06 GMT 08:06 UK
Off with her head
A$5 note
Australia is to drop the Queen's head from its $5 note - the last Australian bank note still carrying the image - it has been reported.

Australian referendum

The move follows a debate last year about the country becoming a republic, a proposal overwhelmingly rejected in a referendum in November.



This step demonstrates yet again the vanishing symbol and irrelevance of the British monarchy to Australians

Greg Barnes, of the Australian Republican Movement
Sydney's Sunday Telegraph reported that Sir Henry Parkes, a 19th century British immigrant and bankrupt turned politician who helped steer Australia's states toward federation in 1901, will replace the Queen.

No-one was available for comment from the Reserve Bank of Australia, but the paper said there were no plans to remove the monarch from Australian coins.

Greg Barnes, of the Australian Republican Movement, said: "This step demonstrates yet again the vanishing symbol and irrelevance of the British monarchy to Australians.

'Republican mood'

"There is no doubt that despite last year's republican defeat, the mood of the nation is republican."


howard
John Howard, with the Queen, is believed to be unhappy about the move
Prime Minister John Howard, who fought to keep the Queen as Australia's sovereign head, was believed to be unhappy, although a spokesman said he would not interfere.

Polls before the referendum last year showed the country was in favour of becoming a republic.

The defeat was blamed on divisions over how to elect an Australian president.

Under the republican proposal, a president would have been elected by members of both houses of parliament, and not in a direct election.


pll
Polls prior to the referendum showed strong support for a republic
A widespread distrust of politicians - as much as strong pro-monarchist sentiment - was seen as fuelling the no vote.

The Queen may even be relieved that her image from the $5 note is going.

Last year she appeared with vibrant red hair cut in a short bob in an advertising campaign.

Her picture - taken from the $5 note - appeared across Australia in a new advert for hair colour by international hair care and cosmetics group Wella.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

01 Nov 99 | Asia-Pacific
The birth of republicanism
06 Nov 99 | UK
Queen pledges to carry on
17 Mar 00 | Asia-Pacific
Queen or country?
Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories