Languages
Page last updated at 11:31 GMT, Thursday, 7 August 2008 12:31 UK

Bush chides Beijing over rights

George Bush urges China to improve its human rights records

US President George W Bush has expressed "deep concerns" over China's human rights record in a speech on the eve of the Beijing Olympics.

"The US believes the people of China deserve the fundamental liberty that is the natural right of all human beings," he said in the Thai capital, Bangkok.

He praised China's economy but said only respect for human rights would let it realise its full potential.

But China rejected the US president's comments.

"The Chinese government puts people first, and is dedicated to maintaining and promoting its citizens' basic rights and freedom," Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said.

"We firmly oppose any words or acts that interfere in other countries' internal affairs, using human rights and religion and other issues."

'Firm opposition'

Mr Bush has been criticised by some campaigners for going to the Games.

He flew to Beijing following the speech in Bangkok, a stop on his final trip to Asia before he leaves office in January.

The wide-ranging address, which included criticism of the regime in Burma, was more nuanced than Mr Bush's past speeches on China, the BBC's Jonathan Head reports from Bangkok.

It is unlikely to cause much offence in China, our correspondent says, and many people will see it more as a valedictory speech for Mr Bush's record in Asia rather than an outline of future US policy.

Mr Bush said he was optimistic about China's future and said change in China would arrive "on its own terms".

Young people who grow up with the freedom to trade goods will ultimately demand the freedom to trade ideas...
George W Bush
US president

But his criticisms of China's human rights record were clear.

"America stands in firm opposition to China's detention of political dissidents, human rights advocates and religious activists," he said.

When it was controversially awarded the games in 2001 by the International Olympic Committee, Beijing promised to make improvements in human rights, media freedoms and the provision of health and education.

But campaigners, such as Amnesty International, say Chinese activists have been jailed, people made homeless, journalists detained and websites blocked, while there has been increased use of labour camps and prison beatings.

In March, China suppressed violent anti-government protests in Tibet. Beijing said rioters killed at least 19 people, but Tibetan exiles said security forces killed dozens of protesters in the worst unrest in Tibet for 20 years.

The Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled Buddhist leader, rejected Beijing's claims he was behind the riots and said he expressed good wishes for the success of Games.

On Thursday, at least 1,500 Buddhists were holding a protest in the Nepalese capital Kathmandu against what they called China's violation of religious freedom in Tibet. Correspondents say there have been scuffles with police.

In Beijing, police dragged away three US Christians who tried to demonstrate on Tiananmen Square in support of religious freedom.

Four pro-Tibet activists from Britain and the US were arrested and held briefly in the city on Wednesday after a protest close to the Olympic stadium.

Burma refugees

In his address, Mr Bush said the US recognised that the growth sparked by China's free market reforms was "good for the Chinese people" and the country's' purchasing power was "good for the world".

On foreign policy, he commended China's "critical leadership role" in the negotiations to end North Korea's nuclear weapons programme, and the "constructive relationship" between Beijing and Washington over Taiwan.

He also called for an end to what he described as tyranny in Thailand's neighbour, Burma.

Friday's Olympic opening ceremony coincides with the 20th anniversary of a democracy uprising in Burma, which was crushed by the military.

First lady Laura Bush flew to the Thai-Burmese border to spend the day at the Mae La refugee camp where about 35,000 refugees live, having fled their homes.


RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific