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Torch relay peaceful in Malaysia

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Crowds cheered for China at the start of the relay

The Olympic torch has been paraded through the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur under heavy security.

The 16km (9.9 mile) relay was largely peaceful - the only notable disruption happening when a Japanese family unfurled a Tibetan flag.

About 1,000 police officers were deployed to guard the torch as it made its way through the rain-soaked city.

When the torch relay went through Europe and the United States, it was met by angry demonstrations.

However it made relatively peaceful progress through other cities, including Bangkok in Thailand and Dar es Salaam in Tanzania.

Landmark route

About 300 Chinese students studying in Malaysia greeted the torch at the airport, along with representatives from the National Sports Council and the police.

Japanese family being heckled as they are led away

The route took the Olympic symbol past some of Kuala Lumpur's main landmarks, finishing at Malaysia's iconic Petronas Twin Towers.

Before the procession began, a Japanese family unfurled a Tibetan flag, before being heckled by a crowd of Chinese nationals, who shouted "Taiwan and Tibet belong to China".

Police intervened to stop the ensuing scuffle and took the three Japanese away.

The torch will travel from Kuala Lumpur to the Indonesian capital Jakarta on Monday night.

Meanwhile, China has urged its citizens to be calm amid further anti-Western protests in the country, focused on French supermarket chain Carrefour.

The protesters have been angered by news of the disruption of the torch relay.


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20 Apr 08 |  Asia-Pacific

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