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Indonesia bans 'anti-Islam' film

Jakarta anti-Dutch protest, 31 Mar 08
Small groups of Indonesian Muslims voiced their anger over the film

Indonesia has banned a controversial film made by a Dutch MP which accuses Islam of inspiring violence.

President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said Geert Wilders, leader of the Dutch right-wing Freedom Party (PVV), would be barred from the archipelago.

The 17-minute film Fitna, which means strife in Arabic, shows terrorist attacks and links them to the Koran.

Small groups of activists gathered outside the Netherlands embassy in Jakarta to protest against the film.

Mr Yudhoyono said world leaders had a moral responsibility to prevent the making of such films.

But he urged protesters not to use violence to make their point.

Earlier, Dutch Foreign Minister Maxime Verhagen called for calm in the Muslim world, saying that hurt feelings need not lead to violence.

The film shows graphic images of terrorist attacks, including the destruction of the World Trade Center on 11 September 2001 and the London and Madrid train bombings, interspersed with verses from the Koran.

The film ends with someone turning pages of a Koran, followed by a tearing sound. It concludes: "Stop Islamisation. Defend our freedom."

Fitna has been condemned by the Dutch government, and Dutch broadcasters have avoided showing it. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has called it "offensively anti-Islamic".

Mr Wilders has received death threats and is under constant police protection.



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SEE ALSO
Dutch MP's film angers Indonesia
31 Mar 08 |  Europe
Dutch MP posts Islam film on web
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Profile: Geert Wilders
15 Oct 09 |  Europe


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