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Monday, 22 November, 1999, 13:12 GMT
Jet crash cuts Tokyo power supply
A T-33 training jet similar to the one that crashed

A Japanese military jet has crashed into power lines, leaving a large area of Tokyo without electricity and killing the plane's crew of two.

The wreckage lies covered with foam
Witnesses near the crash site in Saitama, north of the capital, said they heard a bang and then saw the jet falling in flames into a field near a school.

Some 800,000 houses in central and western Tokyo were affected by the power cut, an official at Tokyo Electric Power Co Ltd said.

The Tokyo Stock Exchange temporarily halted trade in bond futures and options.

About 500 traffic lights went dead and train services on several lines were temporarily halted.

Electricity supplies were restored to most areas by 5pm local time (0800 GMT), Japanese media reported.

'Smoke in the cockpit'

Several train lines were suspended
The two-man crew on the T-33 aircraft were on a training mission when the accident happened.

A defence agency official said the pilots had reported they were experiencing problems, and decided to head straight back to base.

"Then later they said they had smoke in the cockpit, and finally that they were bailing out.

"Although we don't know for sure yet if they deliberately steered away from populated areas, there is a drill to follow if you bail out, with avoiding further victims on the ground of primary importance."
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