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Last Updated: Monday, 5 June 2006, 09:16 GMT 10:16 UK
Manilow to drive out 'hooligans'
Barry Manilow
The council hopes Mr Manilow's music will prove unbearable
A council in the Australian city of Sydney is taking radical measures against car-revving youths - the calming tones of singer Barry Manilow.

Officials in Rockdale say that local youths have been hanging around in car parks, revving their engines and generally annoying residents.

So the council has decided to strike back.

From July, Barry Manilow's greatest hits will be piped into one car park in a bid to drive the youths away.

Deputy mayor Bill Saravinovski said the decision was taken because the youths were intimidating local people.

"They are just hanging out and causing a nuisance to the general public," he told the AFP news agency.

The music will be played for a six-month trial period at a car park in the suburb of Brighton-le-Sands.

Mr Saravinovski said it should not annoy residents, but would will be loud enough for the youths to hear it.

"Daggy music is one way to make the hoons leave an area, because they can't stand the music," he told Australian newspaper The Daily Telegraph.

Daggy is Australian slang for unfashionable or uncool.

The music would not be limited to Barry Manilow, he said.

"It will be all types of classical music and music that doesn't appeal to these people."

Rockdale Council is not the first to employ such measures.

In 1999, the Warrawong Westfield shopping mall in Wollongong played Bing Crosby hits over and over again to drive away loitering teenagers.


SEE ALSO:
Manilow's 50s album tops US chart
09 Feb 06 |  Entertainment
Barry Manilow: From kitsch to cool?
06 Jun 03 |  Newsmakers
Bing keeps troublemakers at bay
09 Jul 99 |  Asia-Pacific
Country profile: Australia
24 Mar 06 |  Country profiles


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