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Last Updated: Thursday, 20 April 2006, 14:41 GMT 15:41 UK
Excerpts: Lucie's mother speaks
Parts of a statement to reporters by Lucie Blackman's mother, Jane Steare, following her "family victim impact statement" to the Tokyo trial of businessman Joji Obara, who denies abducting, raping and killing her daughter.

On her visit to Japan:

Lucie Blackman's mother, Jane Steare
To lose a child and to know her body was desecrated in such an evil way is the greatest and most unrelenting pain I have ever had to endure

I have been particularly moved by ordinary Japanese people here in the streets of Tokyo who have come up to me to say how sorry they are that this has happened.

The purpose of my appearance was to make clear to the court the trauma I have suffered as a result of Lucie's rape, her killing and the horrendous dismemberment of her body.

Lucie was my first-born child.

I was so proud to be a mother when she was born, and so full of love for her.

All her air hostess exams, I was so proud of her, and she looked so beautiful in her uniform.

On the trauma caused by Lucie's kidnap, rape and killing:

Lucie left for Japan on 3 May 2000 in order to pay off her credit cards.

Her handbag was full of guardian angels and crystals that I had bought her to keep her safe.

Lucie Blackman
Her reply began, 'I am still alive'

I was not, however, overly concerned about her work as a bar hostess in Japan.

Her job was simply to keep businessmen company, get them to buy drinks, tell jokes and sing along with the karaoke machine.

The last time I heard from Lucie was two days before she died.

She had been ill with a cold and could not get to the internet cafe.

Her reply began, 'I am still alive'.

When I received the telephone call from her best friend, Louise, to tell me that Lucie was missing, I felt I would die.

I used to believe that the sorrow of any parent losing a child is the greatest sorrow anyone can know, but it got worse.

Her beautiful body had been chain-sawed into pieces.

Her beautiful long hair had been shaved off, and her head had been encased in concrete.

I wonder if she suffered, 'Did she feel any pain? Did she call out my name?' I will never know

To lose a child and to know her body was desecrated in such an evil way is the greatest and most unrelenting pain I have ever had to endure.

I often awake again in the early hours and begin wondering if this was the time of night she died.

I wonder if she suffered, 'Did she feel any pain? Did she call out my name?' I will never know.




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