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Page last updated at 10:12 GMT, Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:12 UK

Indonesia cuts Bali prison terms

Aftermath of the Bali bombings, October 2002
Many Western tourists were among those killed

At least 12 militants jailed in Indonesia over the 2002 Bali bombings have had their sentences reduced to mark independence day.

It is an Indonesian tradition to reduce jail terms on public holidays, but the move is likely to anger Australia, where many Bali victims came from.

But at least one Australian has benefited from the sentence reductions.

Convicted drug-smuggler Schapelle Corby had her 20-year jail term cut by two months.

Another drug smuggler, Renee Lawrence - one of the so-called Bali nine - is also likely to have a small sentence reduction.

'Good behaviour'

The 12 men convicted over the Bali attacks had their sentences cut by up to four months each.

"They are entitled to remissions because they have behaved well," Bali's Kerobokan prison chief Ilham Djaya told Reuters news agency.

The reductions mean that one man, Puryanto, has now been released.

More than 30 people have been jailed for the 2002 Bali blasts, which have been blamed on the South East Asian militant group Jemaah Islamiah.

Those benefiting from Thursday's sentence reductions are thought to have played relatively minor roles in the bombings - such as sheltering the main suspects or helping to finance the attacks.

Several people convicted of playing a more serious role in the attacks are serving life sentences, while three militants - Amrozi, Ali Gufron and Imam Samudra - are due to face the death penalty later this month.

Under the Indonesian system, all prisoners are eligible for remission on independence day, so long as they have served at least six months of a sentence and they are not sentenced to either life in prison or death.

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