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Last Updated: Thursday, 25 December, 2003, 01:20 GMT
Moving stories: Chang Soo Park
BBC World Service's The World Today programme is asking migrants who have been successful in their adopted countries how they got to the top of their field.

Chang Soo Park is a missionary working in Birmingham, England. He came to England from South Korea in 1999.

I used to work as a pastor in a Korean church, but one day I came to realise that every Christian is a member of the world church.

Chang Soo Park (right)
Even if I feel that I face some difficult situation in Britain, I am happy to work with English brothers and sisters to build up the relationship
So after that, I began to pray for a chance to go abroad. Then I came to England.

I wanted to contribute something to the British church, and I joined Queen's College in Birmingham.

It was a wonderful time in my life. One of the college staff contacted a local church to ask the pastor to accommodate me as a trainee.

Spontaneously, some months later, I decided to remain in Birmingham as a missionary.

Up until now, most Korean churches and mission agencies do not want to think the British church could do with some help from the churches in the Third World.

But my experience has made me ask the Korean church to change their attitude and their concept of the British church.

They decided to recognise my ministry in Birmingham, and suggested we built a mission partnership.

Sometimes I miss Korea.

I'm a good orator when I am speaking Korean, but in England, I still struggle to speak English.

Sometimes it makes it difficult to express all the details of what I want to say. I want to chat with a Korean friend. So I do miss Korea.

Also, I think I'm a real Korean still, because I was brought up in a country family. So I miss the atmosphere of the Korean countryside.

I usually say to my brothers and sisters here, "I'm a happy chap."

Even if I feel that it is sometimes difficult in Britain, I am happy to work with English brothers and sisters to build up a relationship - and also work for the Kingdom of God together, which is what my ministry is all about.

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Chang Soo Park
"I usually say to my brothers and sisters here, 'I'm a happy chap'"



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