BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
 Friday, 27 December, 2002, 06:45 GMT
Australia plans anti-terror campaign
Bali bomb scene in October
Fears of attack have heightened after the Bali bombing
The Australian Government is to launch a national media campaign encouraging its citizens to report any behaviour which they deem suspicious.

We do not want to see the Australian way of life changed fundamentally, we are a free and open society and... the government has no desire and no intention to alter that

Australian Prime Minister John Howard
The "Let's Look Out for Australia" advertisements, which will be carried on all media outlets, will run for three months - backed up by pamphlets distributed across the country.

The campaign comes both in the wake of October's Bali bombing, which killed more than 180 people including more than 80 Australians, and last month's announcement by the Australian Government that it had received credible information relating to a possible attack in January in the country.

Police in Sydney have already announced that they are planning huge security on New Year's Eve - including a ban on cars in the city's downtown area - in a bid to thwart potential terror attacks.

'Informative and reassuring'

The campaign includes a 60-second message by television personality Steve Liebmann, which urges the Australian public to "be alert, but not alarmed".

It then gives a free hotline number through which Australians can confidentially report anything they consider suspicious.

Australian Prime Minister John Howard said the advertisements did not encourage Australians to become "amateur spies" but instead were "thoroughly informative and importantly reassuring" for the country.

"We do not want to see the Australian way of life changed fundamentally," he said.

"We are a free and open society and we are a fun-loving, free people, and the government has no desire and no intention to alter that."

Mr Howard also said that he did not believe that Australia's Muslim community would be singled out.

"Muslim Australians have as much interest in a successful education campaign against terrorism as the rest of the Australian community," he said.


Key stories

Eyewitness

Background

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

19 Dec 02 | Asia-Pacific
03 Dec 02 | Asia-Pacific
01 Dec 02 | Asia-Pacific
29 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
31 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
21 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes