BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Thursday, 12 December, 2002, 09:16 GMT
HK's richest woman 'arrested'
Nina Wang
Nina Wang is appealing against last month's ruling
One of Asia's wealthiest women, Nina Wang, has been released on bail after Hong Kong police questioned her over the alleged forgery of her husband's will, according to local media reports.

Radio and television stations said Ms Wang was released after being questioned overnight, though police have not confirmed the identify of the woman involved.

"The woman in her 60s was released on police bail surety of $5m (US$641,000) and is required to report back approximately three months later," a spokeswoman said.

The reported investigation comes after a judge ruled last month that the will used by 64-year-old Nina Wang to claim millions of dollars was a fake.

The court ruled that a 1990 will that appeared to have been hand-written by her husband Teddy, and which left everything to his wife, was falsified.

One month after the will was written, Mr Wang was kidnapped and has never been seen since.

He was declared dead in 1999 and his father began trying to reclaim the fortune.

The Wang story has captivated Hong Kong because of its mix of high-finance, sex and deceit.

Appeal

Ms Wang, known for her pigtails and exuberant dress-sense, will have to hand back at least part of her $2.4bn fortune to her father-in-law Wang Din-shin, whom the court ruled should be the sole executor and beneficiary of his son's estate.

Wang Din-shin, now 91, stands to receive about $128m under the ruling, though Ms Wang's lawyers have vowed to appeal.

The case revolved around three wills.

The first was written in 1960 and would have split Teddy Wang's estate equally between his wife and his father.

In 1968, following allegations that his wife had had an affair, Mr Wang changed his will and left everything to his father. This will is now seen as legally valid.

Ms Wang will hardly be left penniless however. Since her husband's disappearance she has built up his property company, Chinachem, into one of Hong Kong's largest privately-owned companies.

See also:

21 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
07 Aug 01 | Asia-Pacific
01 Aug 02 | Asia-Pacific
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes