BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Monday, 9 December, 2002, 05:40 GMT
US seeks Asian support on Iraq
Richard Armitage (l) and Vice-Foreign Minister Yukio Takeuchi
Armitage's tour got off to a good start in Japan
A senior US envoy has held talks in Japan on the first leg of an Asian tour aimed at building support for Washington's policy on Iraq.

Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage met Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and other senior politicians in Tokyo, telling them President George W Bush was ready to be patient with Baghdad.

Mr Armitage will continue to South Korea, China and Australia later in the week.

Mr Armitage's visit is part of a big US diplomatic offensive that will sound out around 50 nations on possible military action against Baghdad.

No war talk

Mr Armitage told Japanese leaders that the US president was still hoping that Saddam Hussein would disarm.

"He would much prefer to have Iraq disarm herself," said Mr Armitage.

"But, as the president said, 'If Iraq won't disarm, then eventually, Iraq will be disarmed,'" he added.

However, the US envoy said he had not talked about war scenarios with his Japanese hosts.

It is unclear whether Japan will support any military action against Iraq, although last week it agreed to send one of its most sophisticated destroyers to the Indian Ocean to provide non-combat assistance in the war on terrorism.

Mr Armitage expressed his thanks for the Japanese move.

But some opposition politicians in Japan have already attacked the move, saying it violated efforts by the United Nations to resolve the crisis peacefully.

Japan's constitution rejects the use of military force in resolving international conflicts.

BBC correspondent in Tokyo, Charles Scanlon, says Mr Armitage can expect a warm reception on the last leg of his tour - in Australia - but must first travel to South Korea and China.

China, our correspondent says, has spoken consistently in favour of a diplomatic and negotiated solution in Iraq, while anti-American sentiment has risen in South Korea since a recent incident in which two schoolgirls were crushed to death by a US military vehicle.


Key stories

Analysis

CLICKABLE GUIDE

BBC WORLD SERVICE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

08 Dec 02 | Middle East
03 Dec 02 | In Depth
30 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
04 Dec 02 | Asia-Pacific
08 Dec 02 | Asia-Pacific
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes