BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Chinese Vietnamese Burmese Thai Indonesian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Asia-Pacific  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Thursday, 5 December, 2002, 09:38 GMT
Death sentence for Tibetan 'bombers'
A Chinese court has sentenced two ethnic Tibetan men to death for setting off a series of bombs in the south-west of China.

The court found the men guilty of three separate attacks, one of which killed a bystander.

Chinese media says the men were also found guilty of possessing guns for separatist activities.

One of the men's death sentence was later suspended for two years.

China has long accused Tibetan pro-independence activists of a campaign of violence against Chinese targets.

Unusual publicity

But the BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Beijing says details of actual incidents rarely get reported.

In this case, the two Tibetan men were arrested in April this year, shortly after a bomb went off in the centre of Chengdu, the capital of south-west China's Sichuan province.

On Monday, a court in Sichuan found them guilty of that bombing and of two earlier attacks in towns in the far west of the province.

The earlier attacks are reported to have killed one person and injured a number of others.

Both of the Tibetan men are reported to come from the town of Ganzi, in the far west part of Sichuan bordering Tibet.

The area has a majority Tibetan population and has long been a hotbed of pro-Tibetan independence activity.

The town of Ganzi has faced repeated crackdowns by Chinese police trying to root out pro-independence activists.

Western Sichuan was originally known as Cham and was historically part of Tibet.

After the Communists came to power in China in 1949, they amalgamated Cham into Sichuan province.

Two years later, in 1951, China's People's Liberation Army invaded and occupied the rest of Tibet.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Beijing
"China has long accused Tibetan pro-independence activists of a campaign of violence"

Key stories

Background

Profiles

SPECIAL REPORT

WORLD SERVICE

TALKING POINT
Launch LAUNCH POP UP
arrow
See also:

10 Oct 02 | Asia-Pacific
12 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
30 Sep 02 | Asia-Pacific
10 Feb 02 | Asia-Pacific
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes