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Monday, 18 November, 2002, 14:13 GMT
Muslim leader criticises Bali raids
Supporters of the detained radical Muslim cleric Abu Bakar Ba'asyir
Police raids were 'creating anxiety', Hamzah Haz said
Indonesian Vice-President Hamzah Haz has criticised the way police investigating the Bali bombing have raided Islamic boarding schools to hunt for suspects.

Hamzah Haz, a controversial figure who heads Indonesia's Muslim-based United Development Party (PPP), said police should demonstrate more sensitivity.

"I hope raids like the previous ones, which were not pleasant, will not happen again," Mr Haz told reporters on Monday.

Armed police officers stand guard outside as others search Al-Islam boarding school, in Tenggulun village, Lamongan, East Java
This Islamic school has seen repeated raids
Police raids have prompted concern among Indonesia's large Muslim population, and raised the prospect of a backlash against government promises to crack down on terrorist groups.

Mr Haz was speaking as international schools in Jakarta remained closed on Monday because of a feared terrorist threat.

The New York Times quoted diplomats as saying that one planned target was the Jakarta International School, which teaches 2,500 students in buildings across the capital.

More Bali suspects

Meanwhile, the investigation into the bombings on Bali is continuing.

Indonesia's police on Sunday released pictures of six more suspects in the Bali bombing case, including one of the men they say is the leader of the group.

According to the Associated Press, police said they believed at least six of the suspects were hiding out in "sensitive places" within Indonesia.

On Monday, intelligence sources on Bali told the agency that officers believed the men were holed up in "pesantran" (religious schools).

"This will make it difficult," the source, who asked not to be named, said.

Suspects' details

Police said details of the six suspects emerged from the interrogation of an Indonesian man named Amrozi - the only person who has so far been arrested in connection with the bombings.

Indonesia's chief police investigator said Imam Samudra, a native of Sunda on Java island, led both the planning and the execution of the attacks on the Sari Club and Paddy's Bar in Bali on 12 October.

Bali bombing suspect Amrozi (right) poses for reporters with police
Amrozi is the only suspect under arrest

Nearly 200 people were killed in the attacks.

Major General I Made Mangku Pastika said Samudra had frequently visited Afghanistan and learned to make bombs there.

"He is also a suspect for the Christmas bombing in Riau, Batam and Jakarta," Major General I Made Mangku Pastika said, referring to a string of attacks on churches in Indonesia in 2000.

Police say they now have a detailed picture of how the bombings were planned and carried out, and the various roles of the suspects.

  • Imam Samudra - allegedly masterminded the attacks
  • Idris - Samudra's deputy, who allegedly arranged accommodation and funding
  • Amrozi - bought the explosives, owner of the van used for the biggest bomb
  • Ali Imron - 30-year-old brother of Amrozi, a boarding school teacher and courier for the group
  • Dulmatin - second-hand car dealer who allegedly detonated at least one bomb by mobile phone
  • Wayan - 35, who placed the bomb
  • Patek - 35, assistant to Samudra.

He said all the suspects would be arrested "as soon as possible".

But the BBC's Jonathan Head in Jakarta says there is a good chance that the suspects may not be apprehended, as the Indonesian police are thinly stretched.


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13 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
12 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
13 Nov 02 | Asia-Pacific
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